Want to take a virtual class with me next week?

–THIS CLASS IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE–

For the last 25 years, I’ve taught classes at the Sewing and Stitchery Expo in Puyallup, Washington. Every year, over 25,000 people have made the trek. This year, the event is virtual – if you’ve never attended this great event, you can save the trip and have all the fun at home!  

And it’s next week!! This year’s dates are Feb. 25-28. And I would love to see you in the classes and/or lectures that I’m teaching--

Hexies Hybrid Style – No Paper! This is a 2½ hour hands on class. The project features the beloved Grandmother’s Garden Rosette and is half hand-piecing (not-paper piecing) and half machine piecing. There are tips for adapting the idea to other hexagon projects, too. The class kit listed the supplies list is our pattern Hexagon Hybrids #8706. (You’ll get a complete supplies list when you register for the class.)

MORE Machine Quilting in Sections : This is a 1 ½ hour lecture. I am the  head cheerleader for finishing quilts on your home sewing machine! I love to divide a quilt into sections, quilt the sections and then join the quilted sections. I’ve taught quilting in sections for many years; you may already have my book Machine Quilting in Sections #8025. This year we introduced MORE Machine Quilting in Sections #8314 with new techniques, so you can finish even more quilts at home. Many of the new ideas are made possible by fusible products not available when the first book was written.

THIS CLASS IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE. 

PieWashington State University seems to be solving everything except how to eat Marionberry pie, my favorite treat in the Great Northwest, via Zoom! Don’s Drive-In, across the street from Western Washington Fairgrounds, where Sew Expo is usually held each year, makes a delicious Marionberry pie, and I will miss having that special treat this year. The Marionberry is a hybrid blackberry created by the Oregon State University Agricultural Research and Development team in the 1950s. It is sweet, yet tart, and named after the county in which it was developed. If it had been named after the head researcher, I’d love Waldoberry pie!


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